My twin pregnancy and labour story (2011)

img_7702-1In honour of Mother’s Day in the UK, I thought it would be fitting to share my twin pregnancy and labour story; the day I became a mum to two babies.

So here goes…

19 years old, expecting twins, and scared.

In the UK, only 2-3% of births every year are multiples (i.e. more than one child per pregnancy). If you click here you can familiarise yourself with how I found out that I was carrying two.

The best way to describe my pregnancy was: hard. It was one symptom after another, and this made everyday life quite challenging. But the worst symptom of them all was my “morning, afternoon and evening” sickness. I don’t know why it was ever named morning sickness, as it can definitely occur at any time of the day. Unfortunately for me, I could not keep a meal down; resulting in me throwing up everyday of my pregnancy. Yes, everyday. But we thank God for strength.

Thankfully, my labour was the opposite of hard. I think I was favoured to compensate for my difficult pregnancy. The average singleton pregnancy lasts 40 weeks and vaginal birth is usually recommended if there are no complications. However, the prescence of more than one baby lasts less than 40 weeks. Twins are usually born between  35 – 38weeks and triplets, quads and so on are born between 34 – 36 weeks. As well as a shortened pregnancy, carrying multiples increases your chances of birth by caesarian section, so I always had that in mind. I knew that unless I went into labour naturally (which I didn’t), my children would arrive on a scheduled day.

So when I was about 35 weeks pregnant, a routine scan revealed that my daughter (who was on the bottom) was no longer head down and was now breech! Much to my dismay, this meant that a vaginal birth was out of the window. I was mortified and spent way too much time on google researching about the dangers I was about to face.

D-day finally came and we arrived at the hospital at 6am. I had to wait 8 hours to go into theatre due to an unusual amount of emergency c-sections. I was not allowed to eat or drink in this time and that was sooo hard for me.

Emmanuel and I were directed to theatre where we had to get dressed into our fancy scrubs. Then it was time to administer the epidural, which is what I was most scared about. The anaesthesiologist seemed to think that Emmanuel would be a distraction to me so they asked him to leave the room until I had received the epidural. I was crushed! Who was going to hold my hand when this monster needle would be inserted into my back?

I felt very alone, was almost in tears. As I sat on the edge of the bed and hunched over, the surgeon sent over a student nurse to “have a chat with me”. He did not help whatsoever and actually made me more aware of what was going on. Emmanuel definitely would have been the better option to help with my nerves.

Was the epidural painful? Yes absolutely. Glad it was over. They let Emmanuel back in the room and in what seemed like 30 seconds, our babies were out and handed to us. God is so faithful.

Our hearts were so full with joy, then the epidural began to wear off. My God it was painful. The pain after a C-section is indescribable and the recommended healing time of 6 weeks is not an exaggeration. But it doesn’t last forever.

Here I am, 5 years in the mothering game, about to be a mother of 3. I’ve finally stopped pretending to know what I’m doing and I think I’ve got the hang of it.

The role of a mother is a lifetime role and I’m grateful everyday for my children.

To all mothers, Happy Mother’s Day! You are all appreciated. May your hard work and sacrifices never go unnoticed. You are a Blessing to your child(ren) ❤❤❤

As always, thank you for reading.

Leandra

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